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More than one-third of all medium- and heavy-duty commercial trucks registered in the U.S. are now equipped with newer technology clean diesel engines, according to data from HIS Automotive for the Diesel Technology Forum (DTF).

This means that 2.9 million of 8.8 million Class 3-8 trucks registered from 2007 through 2013 are near-zero emission vehicles. Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the DTF, says the statistic is significant considering 95% of heavy-duty trucks are run by diesel.

In 2007, 9.4% had clean diesel engines - and for 2013, it was ar 33.5%. The biggest jump, with a 4.9% increase, was from 2012 to 2013. The lowest was from 2008 to 2009, with an increase of 3.0%.

States with the highest percentage of clean diesel trucks are Indiana (50.4%), Utah (45.4%) and Oklahoma (44.8%). However, Texas, California and Indiana lead for total number of clean diesel trucks.

Under the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2007/2010 heavy-duty engine and highway diesel fuel sulfur control requirements, beginning with the 2007 model year, 100% of the new on-road diesel trucks were required to meet the near-zero particulate emissions standards.


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